Hinamatsuri Gallery

Hinamatsuri Festival

Yesterday, in Japan, it was Hinamatsuri festival, sometimes called Girls’ Day. The most distinctive visual feature of this festival is so called “hina-dan” with “hina-ningyou”, meaning a platform and dolls. The whole display consists of several platforms, and in the top one, there are dolls representing the emperor and empress. These two dolls are the quintessence of hina-ningyou so some people prepare dishes that resemble the two dolls on Hinamatsuri.

The doll sets are very expensive, usually passed on from generation to generation, so many families only have a few dolls, not some 6-platform big sets. On this day, families with girls wish their daughters a happy, fortunate life.

What are the origins and reasons for all this? I will quote Wikipedia on that:

The custom of displaying dolls began during the Heian period. Formerly, people believed the dolls possessed the power to contain bad spirits. Hinamatsuri traces its origins to an ancient Japanese custom called hina-nagashi (雛流し?, lit. “doll floating”), in which straw hina dolls are set afloat on a boat and sent down a river to the sea, supposedly taking troubles or bad spirits with them. The Shimogamo Shrine (part of the Kamo Shrine complex in Kyoto) celebrates the Nagashibina by floating these dolls between the Takano and Kamo Rivers to pray for the safety of children. People have stopped doing this now because of fishermen catching the dolls in their nets. They now send them out to sea, and when the spectators are gone they take the boats out of the water and bring them back to the temple and burn them.

That Tawawa-chan thing is absolutely adorable. I want to take it home~

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

Hinamatsuri Festival

The photos are “borrowed” from various Japanese blogs.