Umineko @ Komagome pilgrimage

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The last post from the series of Umineko no Naku Koro ni pilgrimages. This time, it’s the house that has become the model for the guest house that appears in Umineko no Naku Koro ni. Kyuu Furukawa Teien was built in 1917 by a British architect Josiah Conder, the same architect who designed Kyuu Iwasaki Teien. The park is open daily until 5 PM and the admission is 150 yen. There seem to be some guided excursions of the interior of the house three times a day (10:30, 13:00, 14:30), but I missed that.

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Some more photos:

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It’s very easy to get there. The nearest stations are Komagome (Yamanote Line) and Kami-Nakazato (Keihin-Touhoku Line). Here is the map.


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